Guest post by Amanda Actually

Hello, everyone! My name is Amanda and I’m a cosplayer, fangirl and writer from the United States. Victoria was kind enough to invite me over to her blog for a little discussion on cosplay, chainmaille and attention to detail.

I’ve been cosplaying for many years now and attention to detail is one thing that I’ve always taken to heart. There is no detail piece too large or small for me. Whether it’s small pieces like earrings, bracelets, arm bands or hair pieces down to even big pieces like full pieces of armor, a particular crest or coat of arms and weapon builds larger than my own body. I actually adore chainmaille. It’s an absolute artform and the pieces Victoria makes bring me great joy. I’ve already been planning entire steampunk and Neo-Victorian looks around a few of the bracelets and one of the necklaces.

You may be asking: how do I, like you Amanda, use chainmaille in cosplay?

Well, I’d start small. You don’t have to start with full maille pants. Though that would be really really cool if not at all difficult to go to the bathroom in. Start with a necklace, pendant or choker. These can bring a pop of detail to a pirate look, steampunk attire or even a Victorian or vintage look. Ready for the next step up? Drape sections of chainmaille over gauntlets or leather cuffs to bring a Medieval look to life. Want to go next level? Find a dragon, tame it and take over a castle. Kidding. For the next level I recommend stringing together or custom ordering a section or series of chainmaille to help add a small pop to a larger armor build. I’ve actually been eyeing some larger sections of chainmaille for a Rajput inspired build. These warriors used chainmaille under silk to deflect sword attacks.

Now, as a convention specialist, I have to say that large chainmaille pieces are not always popular at your local anime, video game or comic book convention or expo. Some venues list large chainmaille pieces as potential threats and will make you take off larger armor pieces. Fear not, check your local convention’s rules and adjust as needed. Or visit a local Renaissance faire where rules are left in the modern era.

As always, Victoria and Destai are multi-talented and I’m grateful to be asked to discuss her brilliant works and how they intersect with my world of cosplay and conventions.

You can find me at https://amandaactually.wordpress.com/

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